Inala, Durack, and Richland Conduct Anti-Mosquito Spraying Blitz Due to Japanese Encephalitis Threat

Japanese Encephalitis
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Over 70 suburbs in Brisbane, including Inala, Durack, and Richland, have had an anti-mosquito spraying blitz to ward off threats of the mosquito-borne virus, Japanese encephalitis.



The spraying blitz happened in early March following reports of the first confirmed case in Queensland since 1998, who was treated at the Prince Charles Hospital.

Per Brisbane City Council, the following locations have been targeted for the spraying blitz whilst experts continued to monitor the mosquito traps across the city. Clinicians in the region have been on high on alert as well since the infections of the mosquito-borne virus do not usually present any symptoms.

Albion
Alderley
Anstead
Ashgrove
Bald Hills
Balmoral
Banyo
Bardon
Beachmere
Bellbowrie
Belmont
Brighton
Brisbane Airport
Brisbane City Council
Bulimba
Burbank
Camp Hill
Cannon Hill
Carina
Carindale
Carseldine
Chelmer
Clayfield
Clontarf
Corinda
Darra
Deagon
Deception Bay
Durack
Enoggera
Everton Park
Ferny Grove
Fitzgibbon
Gaythorne
Graceville
Grange
Gumdale
Hemmant
Hendra
Holland Park
Holland Park West
Inala
Karana Downs
Keperra
Kippa-Ring
Kuraby
Macgregor
Mackenzie
Mango Hill
Manly West
Milton
Mitchelton
Moggill
Moreton Bay Council
Morningside
Mt Crosby
Mt Gravatt East
Murarrie
Ningi
Norman Park
Oxley
Pinjarra Hills
Pinkenba
Port of Brisbane
Redland Council
Richlands
Rothwell
Sandgate
Sandstone Point
Seven Hills
Seventeen Mile Rocks
Sherwood
Shorncliffe
St Lucia
Taringa
The Gap
Tingalpa
Toorbul
Toowong
Upper Mt Gravatt
Victoria Point
Wellington Point
Wynnum
Wynnum West

What is Japanese Encephalitis?

Japanese encephalitis presents as an inflammation of the brain but most of the infected usually suffer from mild symptoms only, such as headache or fever. In rare or extreme cases, the infected might experience high fever and chills, vomiting, sensitivity to light, neck stiffness and severe headache.

The virus is transmitted only through an infected mosquito bite that may manifest symptoms within 5 to 15 days of the infection. Claims that the Japanese encephalitis outbreak in Austalia may be due to the Pfizer vaccine has been debunked by the RMIT FactLab. University of Queensland virologist Jody Peters reiterated that humans may only contract the virus from a “Japanese encephalitis virus-infected mosquito.”

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Protecting Yourself

Nonetheless, health agencies are encouraging people to take extra measures to reduce their risks. The Australian Department of Health advice the following:

  • applying and regularly reapplying an effective insect repellent on exposed skin
  • wearing long, loose fitting clothing when outside
  • ensuring accommodation, including tents, are properly fitted with mosquito nettings or screens
  • using insecticide sprays, vapour dispensing units (indoors) and mosquito coils (outdoors) to clear rooms and repel mosquitoes from an area
  • covering all windows, doors, vents and other entrances with insect screens
  • removing any water-holding containers where mosquitoes may breed

The best mosquito repellents to use must contain diethyltoluamide (DEET), picaridin, or oil of lemon eucalyptus. 



Subsequently, locals may be immunised against JE. Distribution and administration of the vaccines will be focused on at-risk groups, such as workers in piggeries, pork abattoirs, or pork-processing plants, laboratory workers who could be exposed to the virus, environmental health workers, and people who reside in locations with confirmed cases.  

The vaccines are expected to be available from late March to April through the Communicable Diseases Network Australia.